Bilins as anticancer agents

Summary A remarkable discovery at Harvard Medical School has led to the recognition that a naturally-occurring small molecule and analogs thereof possess potent anticancer properties through their ability to control cell differentiation. According to the invention, bilins are administered to induce terminal differentiation of dividing mammalian cells and thereby halt uncontrolled cell proliferation. This invention represents a major conceptual departure from traditional, signaling pathway-targeted strategies for tissue engineering and for the treatment of both benign and malignant cell proliferative disorders.

See published U.S. patent applications 20020099085 and 20020169201, each entitled, "Compounds and methods for regulating cell differentiation".

Allowed U.S. patent claims cover administration of bilins to induce differentiation of lymphoblasts, as well as colon adenocarcinoma, thyroid carcinoma and liposarcoma cells. The invention is available for exclusive license.

Applications Therapeutic small molecules. For Further Information Please Contact the Director of Business Development Summary A remarkable discovery at Harvard Medical School has led to the recognition that a naturally-occurring small molecule and analogs thereof possess potent anticancer properties through their ability to control cell differentiation. According to the invention, bilins are administered to induce terminal differentiation of dividing mammalian cells and thereby halt uncontrolled cell proliferation. This invention represents a major conceptual departure from traditional, signaling pathway-targeted strategies for tissue engineering and for the treatment of both benign and malignant cell proliferative disorders.

See published U.S. patent applications 20020099085 and 20020169201, each entitled, "Compounds and methods for regulating cell differentiation".

Allowed U.S. patent claims cover administration of bilins to induce differentiation of lymphoblasts, as well as colon adenocarcinoma, thyroid carcinoma and liposarcoma cells. The invention is available for exclusive license.

Applications Therapeutic small molecules. For Further Information Please Contact the Director of Business Development Alex Szidon Email: alex_szidon@harvard.edu Telephone: (617) 495-3067

Email: alex_szidon@harvard.edu Telephone: (617) 495-3067

Inventor(s): Falchuk, Kenneth H

Type of Offer: Licensing



Next Patent »
« More Chemistry Patents
« More Pharmaceutical Patents

Share on      


CrowdSell Your Patent